1890 Tuesday, January, 7th.

Dundee Advertiser

 A COUPLE OF WIFEBEATERS (Ref. - John Swan)

George Thomson Swan, calender worker, Henderson’s East Wynd, was charged at the Dundee Police Court yesterday with assaulting his wife and son, He pleaded not guilty. John Swan said his father was the worse for drink when he arrived home on Saturday night about seven o’clock. A child four months old was lying very ill in the cradle, and prisoner seemed as if he would fall on it, when witness pushed him back. He then struck the boy, and kicked his wife. Swan said his son had been four years in the Mars, and since he left the ship he has given his parents a lot of trouble, and was up to all sorts of tricks. After similar evidence had been given by Mrs Swan, the charge was found proved, and prisoner was fined 30s, with the option of fifteen days’ imprisonment…

 

Same newspaper as above

 

THE CRUELTY TO A MARS BOY AT SEA. –

 It appears that the lad Thomas Cairns, who was badly used on board the steamship Thomas Anderson on the voyage from Shields to Philadelphia, is not of the same family as the lad whose brother was a shipmate with Macintosh on board the Chieftain. This lad Cairns is presently at home, was never shipped on the Thomas Anderson, nor was he ever on board the Mars. The Thomas Cairns referred to in the Philadelphia Press must therefore be a member of some other family of the same name.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Tuesday, 21st January.

A GANG OF YOUNG THIEVES. – THE LEADER’S HISTORY

Hugh McCann (12), Urquhart Street, was charged with the theft of two washing boards from an ironmonger’s shop in Hawkhill. He pleaded guilty, and whimpered and whined to get off, promising never to do the like again. Mr Dewar said the accused had been repeatedly before the Court for theft and other offences. On 25th September, 1888, he was before the Court for cruelty to animals – cutting off a dog’s tail – and since then he had been before the Court for theft. These charges were withdrawn. The Magistrate sentenced McCann to four years’ training on board the Mars.

The earlier Court case mentioned above –

MUTILATING A DOG

Yesterday, at the Dundee Police Court, Hugh McCann (13), [sic] schoolboy, Ash Street, was accused of cruelly ill-treating a dog by cutting off part of its tale with a hatchet. He pleaded guilty, and stated that another boy told him if he cut off the dog’s tail he would make it a fighting dog. He cut off a bit with the hatchet, and the other boy took off a second bit. It was pointed out that this was McCann’s fourth appearance before the Court. The Magistrate reprimanded McCann for his cruel conduct, and dismissed him with a warning.

 

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 3rd February.

RECRUITS FOR THE MARS – ALEXANDER STEWART

Alexander Stewart (11), was charged with having, on two occasions within the last fortnight, stolen two cotton sheets from his father’s house in Rosebank Road. The boy’s mother was dead. He had wanted him sent to some institution. The charge of theft was withdrawn, and Bailie Macdonald committed the boy to the Mars Training Ship. DAVID BRUCE (11), was next charged with having stolen 10/- from his mother’s house in Princes Street on the 21st January. This was a parallel case to the previous one. He was an illegitimate child, and he had gone beyond his mother’s control. The Prosecutor withdrew the charge of theft, and the boy was committed to the Mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Tuesday, 11th February.

YOUNG ADEPTS AT PICKPOCKETING

In the Police Court yesterday – before Bailie Whyte – Edward Barrit (14) and Joseph Barrit (11), brothers residing in Rosebank Road, were charged with pickpocketing. There were three charges against them, it being alleged 1st, that in Panmure Street on the 30th January, 14/- from a lady; 2nd that on 8th February, at the junction of Kinloch Street and Kinnaird Street, they stole a purse containing 4/6d from the person of a lady; and 3rd , that they stole a on the 9th inst, they stole a purse containing 36/- from the person of a lady while at the junction of Hilltown and Rosebank Street. Both pleaded guilty. Mr Dewar said the boys had never been under the notice of the police before, but they seemed to be well up in pickpocketing – quite adepts. [sic] Their parents were in Court, the mother appearing to be greatly distressed at the conduct of her children. Her grief overcame her when she heard they were both to be sent away, and she had to be gently removed from the Court. The Bailie passed sentence on Edward of 10 days in prison and five years in Old Mill Reformatory. Mr Dewar withdrew the charge against Joseph, and he was committed to the Mars Training Ship till he reached the age of sixteen.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 24th February.

A YOUNG “HEARTBREAK” FROM MONIFIETH

SENT TO THE MARS

On Saturday – before Hon Sheriff-Substitute Littlejohn, in the Dundee Sheriff Summary Court – Andrew McLellan (12), schoolboy, residing at Lyell’s East Land, Monifieth, and James Easson (11), schoolboy, residing at Know-Head of Ardestie, Monikie, were charged with having, on Wednesday, broken into the Golf Club Hall, Monifieth, occupied by the Broughty Ferry Golf Club, and stolen 40 golf balls. Both pleaded guilty. Easson’s father appeared in Court, and stated that the boy was entirely beyond his control, and that he would be glad if he could be sent to any institution where his schooling would be properly attended to. He had been in the practise of carrying clubs to the golfers, and playing truant from school, and had indeed been a “perfect heartbreak” for two or three years. The Fiscal, in view of Easson’s suggestion, withdrew the charge, and the Sheriff then ordered the boy’s committal to the Mars Training Ship, there to be detained until he reaches the age of sixteen, as regards McLellan, it was stated that his mother was unable to appear that day, and his Lordship continued the case till to-day (Mon) in order that she may attend. (McLellan was dismissed with an admonition. Though on Friday 23rd March at the Dundee Police Court- Andrew McLellan (12), East March, Monifieth, was found guilty of breaking into a bothy at Buddon and imprisoned for 10 days and sent to Rossie Reformatory for 5 years.)

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 24th February.

BOY FOR THE MARS – GORRIE

Before Bailie McCulloch, David Gorrie (11), millworker, Kincardine Street, and Thomas Will (10), ropeworker, Hawkhill, were charged with having stolen from a van at the Caledonian Railway Station a quantity of chocolate weighing about 9lbs in all. They pleaded guilty. It was stated that Gorrie’s mother was a widow, and that he had got beyond her control. The Bailie committed him to the Mars training Ship, and Will was dismissed, the charges of theft been withdrawn against both. (Gorrie’s brother George, (12), on Wednesday 16th April, is brought before the Court for theft along with Thomas Wills, Wills was once again admonished and George to 10 days in prison and five years in Rossie Reformatory.)

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Saturday, 29th March.

A RECRUIT FOR THE MARS – Mills - Canning

    John Mills and Michael Canning, both 12 years of age, were charged with the theft of two balls from children in Blackscroft on Thursday. They pleaded guilty. The charge was subsequently withdrawn, and both were committed to the Mars Training Ship till they reached the age of 16 years.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Thursday, 1st April.

NARROW ESCAPE OF A MARS BOY

GALLANT RESCUE

      About 6 o’clock last evening William Green, a Mars boy, belonging to Glasgow, fell from the ship’s side from a height of about twelve feet into the water, and immediately sank, being apparently stunned. A boat was speedily launched, and went to the rescue, but before it could reach the lad he was carried swiftly down the river, there being a strong ebb tide running at the time. Seeing that there was little hope of the boat reaching him in time, an officer of the watch, Mr Hugh McMahon, gallantly plunged overboard, and having overtaken him, held him up until the boat arrived. There is little doubt that but for the gallant conduct of the officer the boy would have been drowned.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 7th April.

STOCKING THE MARS – Murray, Moodie, Hickie.

     On Saturday in the Sheriff Court Thomas Murray and Robert Moodie, both lads from Lochee, were brought before Sheriff Campbell Smith as applicants for admission to the Mars. Mr Campbell, of the Boys’ Home, reported that the lads were taking up with bad company, were beyond the control of their guardians, and were in danger of drifting into crime. The Sheriff thereupon granted an order for the boys to be sent to the Training Ship Mars until they attain the age of 16. At the Police Court, James Hickie (11), schoolboy, Overgate, was brought to the bar charged with the theft of a purse containing 7/-d from a house in Overgate on the 29th March. He pleaded guilty. His father stated that the boy had got beyond his control, and he wanted him sent to some institution. The charge was accordingly withdrawn, and the boy committed to the Mars till he reached the age of sixteen.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Wednesday, 16th April.

ANOTHER BOY FOR THE MARS – James Burke

Yesterday, in the Sheriff Court – Hon Sheriff Substitute Littlejohn on the bench – James Burke (12) appeared as an applicant for admission to the Mars. It was explained by Mr Campbell of the Boys’ Home, that the lad was fast drifting into crime and keeping bad company. He was committed to the Mars until he attained the age of 16.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Saturday, 7th June.

A SUBJECT FOT THE MARS – David Peters

     David Peters, a boy 12 years of age was brought before the Court as an applicant for the Industrial School. He came to the Northern Police Office on Thursday night and stated that he was destitute. On making inquiries it was ascertained that he was as good as an orphan. His father was dead and his mother was in Westgreen Asylum. He had some brothers and sisters, but they would not or could not find a home for him, and some of them declared that he would neither work nor go to school. After making some further inquiries the Bailie committed him to the Mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Friday, 27th June.

A RECRUIT FOR THER MARS – Joseph Geddes

    Yesterday in Dundee Sheriff Court – Sheriff Campbell Smith on the bench – Joseph Geddes (12), was brought forward as an applicant for the Mars Training Ship. It was stated that the boy has not been attending school, and that he had been keeping bad company. His mother was in destitute circumstances, and the whereabouts of his father were unknown. The Sheriff committed him to the Mars till he attained the age of 16.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Wednesday, 16th July.

YOUNG PIGEON FANCIERS

   Before Bailie Kay – James Reid (13), Watson’s Lane, Robert McMillan (9) Seafield Road, John King (9), Hilltown, and Patrick Cushney, jun., (9), Dalfield Walk, were all brought to the bar charged with stealing pigeons. There were three charges in which they were all more or less implicated. The number of pigeons stolen amounted to 33, viz – four from a dovecot in Tait’s Lane, nine from another in Seafield Road, and twenty from a pigeon-house in Watson’s Lane, all of which had been feloniously removed between the 8th and 13th July current. Mr Dewar said he would not ask for a conviction against them, and in regard to the others, Reid and McLean, he also withdrew the charge against them, that they might be dealt with under the Industrial Schools Act. Reid has evidently led on the others. He was a stout lad, and a fit subject for the Mars to which institution the Bailie consigned him. (McLean was sent to Baldovan and the rest sent home with their parents.)

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Thursday, 21st August.

VISIT OF THE MARS BOYS TO EDINBURGH EXHIBITION

      Through the generosity of Mr Lindsay Bennet, of London and St Andrews, the boys of the Mars Training Ship visited the Edinburgh  Exhibition yesterday. The boys to the number of 350, including the band, travelled by special train via the Forth Bridge, arriving at the Exhibition shortly after 11 o’clock. They were supplied with a sumptuous dinner, and afterwards visited all the notable sights of Exhibition, including the Panorama of Trafalgar and the Japanese Village. In both of which they were much interested. The clever acrobatic and juggling feats of the Japanese elicited their intense admiration. The boys behaved admirably, and attracted much attention. Many of them were met by friends and relatives at the Exhibition. After tea the band played several selections of Scotch tunes, and the whole of the lads joined in hearty cheers for their generous benefactor, who was present all the time, and who, regardless of exposure, made every possible arrangement for the comfort and enjoyment of his young guests.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Friday, 12th September.

DUNDEE AS A FIELD FOR IMMIGRATION

THE ESCAPADES OF THE SETTLERS

       Before Bailie Whyte – Michael Rafferty, a boy about 12 or 13 years of age, was brought before the Court as an applicant for the Mars. Mr Dewar said the boy was found destitute in Seagate about 1’oclock on Thursday, 4th inst. He said he belonged to Edinburgh, and left the city and came to Dundee in search of work on Tuesday last. He crossed the Forth by the Ferry and tramped to Newport, and arrived in Dundee on Wednesday. Communication had been made with his father, who has expressed a desire that he should be sent to the Mars. The boy could neither read nor write the Bailie committed the boy to the Mars – William Stark and Robert Cockburn, two boys, who were found along with another named Sinclair, lying in a crate in a close in Murraygate on Friday morning last, were also brought before the Court under the Industrial Schools Act. They had also come from Edinburgh in search of work without the knowledge of their parents. Their friends had been communicated with. Sinclair’s father had come for his boy, but Stark’s and Cockburn’s fathers were unable to send for them, but wished them committed to the Mars. The Bailie committed the boys to the Mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Saturday, 27th September.

BOY FOR THE MARS - Baird

Robert Baird (12), a respectably dressed boy, was brought forward  yesterday at the Police Court as an applicant for the Mars. He had come beyond the control of his mother, who was a widow, and was associating with bad boys. He was committed to the Mars.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Saturday, 27th September.

RECRUIT FOR THE MARS – Cassey

A brand from Ramsay’s Pend- yesterday in the Police Court – before Bailie Speed – Andrew Cassey (11), a ragged barefooted urchin, from Ramsay’s Pend, was brought to the bar charged with having committed a series of Petty thefts from shop doors in various parts of the town within the past few weeks. The articles stolen were chiefly pasteboard boxes containing braces, which he afterwards appropriated, and two pairs of trousers he fancied in a broker’s shop in Hilltown. The boy’s mother appeared in Court, but his father was said to be in prison at present for committing a breach of the peace. Mrs Cassey stated that the boy was beyond her control. She believed he had not been six nights in the house altogether for the last six weeks. Mr Dewar having withdrawn the charges, and suggested that the boy should be sent to the Roman Catholic Industrial School at Tranent, Mrs Cassey said she was not partial to a Catholic school and would rather that he was sent to a Scotch Institution where she could see him occasionally. Mr Dewar pointed out that the Directors of Baldovan Institution had decided not to receive any more Catholic boys, as such boys were no sooner committed to their charge than action was taken to effect their removal, after some further consultation the bailie committed the boy to the Mars Training Ship till he attain the age of 16 years.

 

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Saturday, 29th September.

PROMENADE CONCERT AT THE BANDSTAND

The band of the Training Ship Mars, under Mr W. Douglas Davidson, Bandmaster, will discourse the following programme at the bandstand, Magdalen Green, this afternoon, commencing at 3 o’clock.

March…”A Distant Greeting.”…Doring

Fantasia…”O’er Land and Sea.”…E. Newton

Valse…”The Little Soldiers.”…Theo Bonheur

Polks…”Loving Hearts.”…M. Seaman

Cornet Solo (Song)…”A Dream of Heaven.”…J.S.Crook

Valse…”The Bridal Rose.”…Geo Webb.

Selection…”Songs of Britain.”…W.V. Scholes

“God Save the Queen.”

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 29th September.

21st ANNIVERSARY OF THE MARS

An interesting feature in the proceedings will be the presentation of prizes by Lady Elgin. The following is the list of prize-winners -

Best All-Round Boy – Joseph Mathieson

6 Smartest Sailor Boys – Thomas Begley, David Jamieson, George Hogg, Francis Mulholland, Alexander Gordon, and George Stephenson.

6 Best Oarsmen – William Thomson, William Coyle, John Hemsley, William Spellman, William Brannan, and Thomas Brannan.

4 Best Coxswain of Boats – William Grindall, James Robertson, Matthew Lyons, and Patrick Anthony.

4 boys who have made most Progress in Swimming – John Gunning, John Campbell, Hugh Dearie, and William Lockhart.

3 Best Band Boys – Thomas Hill, Robert Mathieson, and James Ferris.

6 Most Industrious Tailor Boys – Patrick Deans, and Alexander McLauchlin and Joseph Connell.

Best Carpenter Boy – James Grosset.

Best Cook’s Boy – John Grieg.

Tidiness and care of clothes – J. Sheridan, J. Hunter, Alexander Burnett, Thomas Imrie, and J O’Brien.

School Prizes for Good Conduct and Efficiency –

1st  class, Charles Rourke and John Brown;

2nd class, James Goldie and Alexander Gilzean;

3rd class, Charles Combe and Thomas Cunningham;

4th class, William Doyle and Edward Thomson;

5th class, Robert McGlashan and James Irvine…

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 13th October.

BOY FOR THE MARS – Taylor

Before Bailie Macdonald James Taylor (11) apprentice roper, Hilltown, pleaded guilty to having stolen 3d from a blacksmith’s shop in Strathmartine Road. It was stated that the boy had been living with his grandmother, as he could not agree with his stepmother. He had got beyond his grandmother’s control, and his father, who lived in Lochee, appeared to be rather indifferent regarding him. The Bailie committed the boy to the mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Saturday, 8th November.

RECRUIT FOR THE MARS – Miller

John Miller, a boy about 12 years of age, was brought before the Court as an applicant for the Mars. The boy belonged to Edinburgh, where his parents resided. About a fortnight ago he ran away from home, and came to Dundee, and was found sleeping in an empty crate in Greenmarket one night last week. As a destitute waif he was committed to the poorhouse for a week. Inquiries having been instituted in Edinburgh, it was ascertained that the boy had been going beyond the control of his parents, and associating with thieves, With the consent of his parents, Bailie Craig committed him to the Mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday 10th November.

RECRUITS FOR THE MARS – John and Allan Lister

   Two boys named John Lister and Allan Lister, 12 and 11 years of age respectively, were brought up. Mr Campbell, of the Boys’ Home, reported that the applicants had little or no education, were keeping bad company, and were in danger of drifting into crime. His Lordship committed the Listers to the Mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Wednesday, 26th November.

SENT TO THE MARS – Mitchell

In the Dundee Sheriff Court yesterday before Sheriff Campbell Smith – a boy named David Mitchell was brought forward as an applicant for admission to an Industrial School. Mr Campbell, of the Boys’ Home, stated that the lad was in the habit of keeping bad company, and that there was a danger of drifting into crime. His Lordship sent him to the Mars until he attains the age of 16.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Monday, 8th December.

AN INCORRIGIBLE ARAB – Anderson

James Anderson (13), Ash Lane, and John McCabe (14), Horsewater Wynd, pleaded guilty to having stolen two pieces of wood from a shuttle-maker’s premises in Cowan’s Court, north Tay Street. It was stated by Mr Dewar that the boy Anderson had very little education, and that he would neither work nor go to school. After some consideration Anderson was committed to the Mars Training Ship.

 

1890 Courier & Argus

Tuesday, 30th December.

SENT TO THE MARS – Ritchie

Yesterday, in the Dundee Sheriff Court – Hon Sheriff-Substitute Littlejohn presiding, -Alfred Peter Ritchie (13), Perth Road, was brought forward as an applicant for admission to the Mars Training ship. Mr Campbell, of the Boys’ Home, stated that Ritchie’s father was dead and that his mother was an invalid, and that he had no proper guardian. Upon the usual inquiry, his Lordship sent him to the Mars until he attained the age of 16.