1886 Thursday, January 21st.

(Aberdeen Weekly Joiurnal)

  STONEHAVEN BOY SENT TO THE MARS

Yesterday, in the Sheriff Court, Stonehaven, Mr George S. Caird, Procurator Fiscal, made application to have William Balneaves, labourer, Bogattyhead, Dunnottar, sent to the Mars Training Ship, Dundee, on the ground that he had got beyond the control of his parents. Evidence was given to shows that the lad had been misbehaving himself, and Sheriff Wilson granted a warrant to have him sent to the Mars until he had attained the age of 16.

1886 Courier & Argus

Thursday, 8th April.

THE MARS TRAINING SHIP CASE

(James Ritchie Lothian Anderson)

At the Edinburgh Sheriff Summary Court yesterday – Sheriff Hamilton on the bench – Mrs Anderson, Gordon Street, Leith, was again charged with contravening the Industrial School Act, by having assisted her boy to escape from the Mars Training Ship…

The case was fully supported when Mr Anderson pleaded guilty on Saturday. Yesterday Mrs Anderson pleaded not guilty…A Sheriff Officer detailed the circumstances of the case from the time it was first brought into Court, mentioning that Mrs Anderson had at a previous Court offered to send the boy back to the ship. Sheriff Hamilton found the charge proven. He was quite willing to mitigate the penalty if Mrs Anderson now for told where the boy was, for it was in vain for her to say that she did not know. She had shown no anxiety regarding the whereabouts of the boy. Mrs Anderson said she did not know where the boy was since she had sent him to Dundee. The Sheriff said he was not willing to impose a large penalty, because it would probably fall on the husband, who was least to blame. He fined her £5, failing payment, fourteen days’ imprisonment.

(See also February 1887)

 

1886 Courier & Argus

Tuesday, 20th April.

THEFT BY AN OLD MARS BOY – ALEXANDER FENWICK

Carter Liff Road, Lochee, pleaded guilty to stealing 16/- from a bakehouse in Lochee on Monday, 29th March. It was stated that the accused served a term of years on board the mars. Sentence of 20 days’ imprisonment was imposed.

 

1886 Courier & Argus

Thursday, 29th April.

THE SINS OF THE FATHER VISITED ON THE CHILD

PETER BRANNON

Yesterday, in the Dundee Police Court – before Bailie Perrie – A boy named Peter Brannon, between 11 and 12 years of age, residing in Lyon Street, was brought before the Court charged with theft. The libel set forth that his mother intrusted him with a 1/- to go to a pawn office and relieve a shoulder shawl for her, but instead of fulfilling his commission he stole the money. He pleaded guilty to the charge, in order that the boy might be dealt with under the Industrial School Act. The parents were said to be living separate, the father cohabiting with another woman, and they had been both before the School Board about the education of the boy. The Assessor (Mr Thornton) remarks that because of the sins of the parents the ratepayers would have to pay for the child. Mr Dewar said the were both here.

Assessor – Yes, and they will be overjoyed to get the boy off their hands.

The father retorted - that he did not wish the boy sent to an Industrial School he wanted to get him home.

Assessor – You wish the boy home to live with you, and you living a life of adultery?

Father – I suppose I can live where I like.

Mr Dewar – The father was said to be a Roman Catholic and the mother a Protestant.

The Assessor – remarked that the boy was the only one to be cared for. He would be better in the Mars than living in an adulterous household.

The Mother – said she wished the boy sent to the mars, and he was anxious to go himself.

The Assessor – Hoped the authorities would look after the case.

The boy was then committed to the Mars.

 

1886 Courier & Argus

Friday, 30th April.

DUNDEE POLICE COURT – JAMES LAIRD

James Laird, 11 ½ years of age, stepson of James Dow, carter, Milnbank Road, was brought before the Court as an applicant for the Mars. From a report prepared by Sergeant McBey, it appeared that the boy had been at school and had some education, but of late he had been keeping company with thieves and other bad characters, and staying in a disreputable house in Miller’s Pend in the company of two women of evil reputation, The Bailie committed the boy to the Mars Training Ship.

 

 

1886 Tuesday, 1st June.

Courier & Argus

THE STATE OF EDUCATION AMONGST THE “ARABS”

OF DUNDEE – JOHN CANNON,

In the Police Court on Monday three boys, named John Cannon, James Cannon, and William Webb, between 11 and 12 years of age, were bought before the Court charged with begging in Commercial Street on Saturday. They all pleaded guilty. In regard to the Cannons, Mr Dewar said that John was 11 ½ years of age, and could neither read nor write. He had been working half-time, but was lately dismissed from his employment, and had been going about begging for some time back. His mother was alive, but his father died about twelve months ago. There were seven other members of the family, three of whom were working. The religion of the family was Roman Catholic. The boy Webb was twelve years of age and had no education, and would not attend school. His parents were alive. The father a labourer, and earned £1 a week. There were only two other members of the family whose religion was Protestant. To test their educational acquirements a book was brought, and a passage pointed out for the boys to read. It was found that the Cannons could read a little, but Webb did not even know his letters. His parents appeared in Court, and stated that they kept their son at school, and paid fees for him since he was six years of age. The Bailie sharply admonished and dismissed the boy. John Cannon was committed to the Mars, and James was dismissed.

 

 

1886 Tuesday, July 27th.

Glasgow Herald

 

SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN

 

At the J.P. Court yesterday- before Mr Thomas Aikman, at the instance of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children –

The following cases were disposed of :- James McGowan, 13 years, and Andrew Cochrane, 11 years, found sleeping out at night by the officers of the Society, and beyond the control of their parents were sent to the Mars Training Ship at Dundee for 3years or 4 years respectively.

 

 

1886 Courier & Argus

September 4th.

MARS BAND AT DUNDEE HORTICULTURAL SHOW, MAGDALEN GREEN

    When the Mars band entered the show yard I witnessed a little incident that brought a smile to many more faces besides mine. The boys ranged themselves round the band stand, on which were sitting the 4th Hussars band. Almost immediately, one of the Mars’ boys in an audible whisper, “gie us a bit o’ baccy!” The pouches of the men were out in a moment, and doles of tobacco dropped into the boys’ caps, which were eagerly held out for what is to them “forbidden fruit.” When smoking is strictly prohibited, as I suppose it is on board the Mars so far as the boys are concerned, chewing, which is a far worse habit, is resorted to. The bandsmen’s donations would probably have to undergo a farther process of redistribution when the boys go back to the ship.

(The Hussars played at 11.30 and 7 in the evening and the Mars band played at 3 o’clock.)

 

 

1886 Courier & Argus


 Monday, 2nd November.

RECRUIT FOR THE MARS – ALEXANDER McDONALD,

   13 years of age, residing with his parents in Dallfield Walk, appeared as an applicant for the Industrial School. It was stated that he had got beyond the control of his parents, and was associating with thieves. He could not be trusted with money, and often kept his school fees, and then stayed away from the house for days. In the circumstances the Bailie committed him to the Mars.

 

Thursday, 23rd December. 1886 Courier & Argus

 

 

ANOTHER RECRUIT FOR THE MARS – DAVID JAMIESON

     About 12 years of age, was brought before the Court as an applicant for the Industrial School. He had been at school, and had got a little education, but he had got beyond the control of his mother, and was associating with thieves, and staying out at night. The bailie committed him to the Mars Training Ship.