June 22nd 1897.

 Dundee Year Book


At Baxter Park, it was fitting that the poor children of the city should share in the Lord Provost’s Bounty…
    While over 4000 children were being marshalled into order at the gymnasium by about 150 teachers who had kindly given their services for the occasion, eight companies of the boys’ brigade, the boys of the Mars Training Ship and Baldovan Industrial School had taken up position at the north east corner of the park, in the form of three sides of a square, spaces being also allotted to the Girls Industrial School children. As the children filed out of the gymnasium they were each presented with a Jubilee mug and a packet of pastry. They were marched to the position which had been prepared for them, taking their places in detachments within the square. They presented an interesting spectacle – the wee toddling mite to the robust schoolboy, all aglow with excitement, which even the pelting rain could not dampen down. Once in position a plentiful supply of lemonade was handed out, and at nature’s table the youngsters feasted to their heart’s content…
   There was, as might be expected, a good deal of scrambling, made conspicuous by contrast with the well disciplined ranks of the Boys’ Brigade, Mars and Industrial School Boys, but considering the occasion and the circumstances the whole proceedings passed off very successfully…
    Excellent music was discoursed by the bands of the Mars and Baldovan Industrial School during the proceedings…
ON THE RIVER.
   At six o’clock in the evening, in a delightfully mild atmosphere, the steamer Dundee, with a company of about 150 gentlemen who had assembled on the invitation of the Harbour Trustees, steamed out into the river, which at that time was as calm, as the proverbial millpond. The primary object from what was thought would be – and as it turned out correctly so – a veritable coign of vantage. Several hours later, however, had still to elapse before the exhibition began, and these were pleasantly spent in sailing to Bambreich and back. On the return journey the company sat down to dinner in the saloon, under the Presidency of Mr Andrew Leitch…
   It anchored about 100 yards to the west of the bridge and in full view of the Magdalen Green. Soon a number of pleasure boats hove in sight and began taking up positions around the steamer, while the Albion and Renown, with large compliments of sightseers, were brought up a short distance off. The Dundee had the honour of opening the illuminations, and a number of rockets being fired under the superintendence of Captain Yule. Soon however, there was an answer from the shore, rockets shooting across the northern sky in quick succession. These were followed by illumination of a more brilliant character, not the least being reflection of the variegated colours on the river. The Mars presented a very pretty picture. The old battleship, which by day had been gay with bunting, displayed a line of lights. These were of varied colours, and were carried right over the towering masts in a half-circle of jewel-like lights. The bonfires on the surrounding hills were very imposing. Far away on the Perthshire heights the beacons blazed forth with majestic grandeur, while ‘like volcanoes flared to heaven’ the green clad hills of Fife.